So now we know why there won’t be a Presidential Super Bowl interview. Let’s be grateful

If you were Joe Biden’s campaign manager, how would you help him win reelection? Ideally, you’d like his public appearances to be no less carefully choreographed than North Korea’s Mass Games. And you’d shield him from mean people in the press as vigilantly as a helicopter mom polices the playground to minimize Biden’s senior moments. His handlers aren’t as delusional as their boss is, and so this is precisely their game plan. That’s why there’ll be no Super Bowl interview with the President this weekend. And for this, we can all be grateful.

I’m a long-suffering fan of the Buffalo Bills, who’ve had their season vaporized in three of the last four seasons by the Kansas City Chiefs. And so, the prospect of seeing the Chiefs potentially hoist another Lombardi trophy Sunday with all the insufferable Taylor Swift hype and Patrick Mahomes worship is already bad enough without enduring a Joe Biden interview. Biden is supposedly an Eagles fan, but after his team lost to the Chiefs in the Super Bowl last year largely based on a bogus penalty, he invited the Chiefs to the White House and effectively disowned the Birds, claiming his wife, Dr. Jill, was a fan but, like a good politician, remaining officially neutral himself. Some fan.

The presidential Super Bowl interview tradition dates to 2004 and then President George W Bush. There’s talk here in the press about what a lost opportunity this is for Biden. After all, even during the pre-game, when most of the interview would have aired, some 20 million Americans or more are tuned in. But the tradition isn’t exactly a cherished one – all but the most comprehensively brainwashed Democrats would probably rather sit through a five-day cricket Test match before a lengthy Joe Biden interview at this point, no disrespect to cricket fans intended.

Trump bailed on the Super Bowl interview in 2018. Last year Biden’s team joked about doing the interview with Fox Soul, a Fox Corporation streaming network that even people who work there likely don’t know about, before taking a knee. Since becoming president, Biden has done 86 interviews, versus 300 for Trump and 422 for Barack Obama at this point in their presidencies, according to data collected by The White House Transition Project. This is supposedly a very bad thing indeed, but I reckon his 86 interviews are approximately 85 too many. Seriously, Joe, just go into hiding already.

The special counsel report on his handling of classified materials released this week described him quite accurately as an “elderly man with a poor memory”, who couldn’t recall which years he was vice president among other embarrassing lapses. In recent days he called Hamas “the opposition” because he couldn’t remember their name and spoke as though Helmut Kohl and Francois Mitterrand were still in power.

“My memory is fine” Biden said of the special prosecutor’s report but later proved it isn’t by referring to Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al Sisi as “the president of Mexico”.

Trump has memory lapses too and is also erratic and unfit for office, though in other ways. But in his mad rambling, at least there’s entertainment value. On Thursday, for example, he said migrants were “being dumped in from mental institutions, from prisons and jails…they come out of places you don’t want to know about”. Predictably, Trump offered to take the Super Bowl interview slot, but CBS hasn’t offered one. His ratings would be much better than Biden’s, but the likely result would be millions of Americans remembering why they wish there was another team to root for.

The post So now we know why there won’t be a Presidential Super Bowl interview. Let’s be grateful appeared first on The Telegraph.

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